"It’s hard to trust your child to find his or her own path, especially when we’re told every day by professionals that children must fit into rigid boxes. We all want to give our kids the best opportunities we can, which is why it feels like such a disservice if we don’t push them in the ‘right’ direction. Celebrating your children’s passions rather than redirecting them, especially when those passions don’t line up neatly with a checklist for future success, can feel like jumping off a cliff. It certainly did for me. But that leap of faith is necessary if your kids are going to fly."

Kristine Barnett, The Spark: A Mother’s Story of Nurturing Genius.

From the jacket:

Kristine Barnett’s son Jacob has an IQ higher than Einstein’s, a photographic memory, and he taught himself calculus in two weeks. At nine he started working on an original theory in astrophysics that experts believe may someday put him in line for a Nobel Prize, and at age twelve he became a paid researcher in quantum physics. But the story of Kristine’s journey with Jake is all the more remarkable because his extraordinary mind was almost lost to autism.

(via memos-and-musings)

koppersmiles:

ghostwriters-r-us:

bluhbluhhugedork:

wristsareforbracelets:

fight-the-world:

diagondaley:



SUMMERHILL SCHOOL!!! ENGLAND!!!! 

My teacher told me about this in high school. As humans we have a natural thirst for knowledge. While naturally kids did their own thing for the first few weeks they eventually started going to class. It teaches them to want to go to class. You’re not forced to learn and because of that you want to learn.

THAT’S BRILLIANT 

THE FIRST COMMENT THO

I was un-schooled. meaning one of my parents stayed home with me and gave me options on what I wanted to learn. then taught me, or got me classes, and just generally supported my passions and interests. I love the idea of this school and I think that’s how most learning should be.    everyone learns differently, some people thrive in the school system as it is, meaning the way classes are structured, taught, the way homework is given, ect. that works for some people, but not for all, not even most.  I think education should be diverse, supported, and encouraged, but certainly not mandatory.  we should trust that people will follow their passions, learn, and become whatever the world needs.     yay for educational diversity and autodidactic learning <3

koppersmiles:

ghostwriters-r-us:

bluhbluhhugedork:

wristsareforbracelets:

fight-the-world:

diagondaley:

image

SUMMERHILL SCHOOL!!! ENGLAND!!!! 

My teacher told me about this in high school. As humans we have a natural thirst for knowledge. While naturally kids did their own thing for the first few weeks they eventually started going to class. It teaches them to want to go to class. You’re not forced to learn and because of that you want to learn.

THAT’S BRILLIANT 

THE FIRST COMMENT THO

I was un-schooled. meaning one of my parents stayed home with me and gave me options on what I wanted to learn. then taught me, or got me classes, and just generally supported my passions and interests. I love the idea of this school and I think that’s how most learning should be.
    everyone learns differently, some people thrive in the school system as it is, meaning the way classes are structured, taught, the way homework is given, ect. that works for some people, but not for all, not even most.  I think education should be diverse, supported, and encouraged, but certainly not mandatory.  we should trust that people will follow their passions, learn, and become whatever the world needs.
    yay for educational diversity and autodidactic learning <3

(via bardtalons)

educationalliberty:

Don’t Go Back to School: How to Fuel the Internal Engine of Learning